Art Crush / Yayoi Kusama at The Broad

The Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is one fascinating human. In 1977, she voluntarily admitted herself into a Tokyo hospital where she writes poems and writes stories; living and working from there to this day. On the occasion, Kusama continues to conceptualize and create always highly regarded installations in the world’s most reputable museums. The Broad is exhibiting her Infinity Mirrors until January 1, 2018 and I.Want.To. Go. Here’s some background on the exhibit, “Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors will provide visitors with the unique opportunity to experience six of Kusama’s infinity rooms—the artist’s most iconic kaleidoscopic environments—alongside large-scale installations and key paintings, sculptures and works on paper from the early 1950s to the present, which contextualize the foundational role the concept of infinity has played in the artist’s work over many decades and through diverse media. The traveling exhibition marks the North American debut of numerous new works by the 88-year-old artist, who is still actively creating in her Tokyo studio. These include large-scale, vibrantly colored paintings and her most recent infinity room, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins, 2016.” Catch the #yayoikusama feed on Instagram to see how incredible it looks! Wow wow. Top photo: Oh Joy!

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Art Crush / The Multi-Textured Art of Illustrator Naomi Elliott

Totally feeling the simplicity of Brooklyn based designer and illustrator Naomi Elliott’s multi-textured art. Her process involves combining stencils with hand drawn elements to create a rich final image and I’m really digging it. Feels calming and somehow reassuring. The women seem to hold their own, don’t they? Plus, super stylish… Check out more of her work here!

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Art Crush/ Floral Installation Artist Rebecca Louise Law

Imagine walking into a floral installation, better still…a hanging garden. That kind of situation is stimuli overload and I’m pretty sure I would die happy right then and there. Maybe you’re with me on this, but I have a maddening inner struggle with my love for fresh flowers. It’s my go-to at the farmers market each Saturday (along with avocadoes, of course), but I can’t shake the notion that I’ve aided in their demise by cutting them from their rooted life. Then I came across the work of Rebecca Louise Law, an Installation Artist based in East London, specialising in artworks made with natural materials, namely flora. Law is passionate about natural change and preservation, allowing her work to evolve as nature takes its course and offering an alternative concept of beauty. Here’s her take (via Huffington Post), “Flowers have become some throwaway thing you buy at a supermarket,” she says, “but all aspects of nature, even the decaying process, have value.” In fact, her ideal project is one that would never stop growing: “I’d love to do a permanent installation in a church or a lighthouse that I can always add to,” Law says, “where people can watch new and old flowers change and age over years and years”. “As an art student at England’s Newcastle University, Rebecca Louise Law wanted her nature-inspired oil paintings to invite viewers into a captivating setting, but didn’t think a flat canvas was up to the task. “I needed new materials to create an immersive experience,” says Law, 34. So she tapped into her roots for inspiration — “My dad is a gardener and grows thousands of flowers. It was crazy for me not to use them!” With help from her green-thumbed pop, she began hauling carloads of bouquets to her studio and sculpting 3-D installations that could spring from a wall or hang from a ceiling.” Daydreaming goals, you guys. [See more of Law’s work here + this Huffington Post article, as well]

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Art Crush/ Winter Holidays Edition: Amy Friend

Have I shared that I’m keeping my Holiday decorating to a minimum this year? I’ve grown more accustomed to simplifying my life, in every area. Really learning to scale back on the material accumulation, as well as mental accumulation (one can influence the other, don’t you think?). And anyway, it feels good. I only mention this because I’ve placed tiny strands of white lights around my home for getting into the Wintery spirit (along with a gold tray of a small cluster of vintage ornaments and vases of flowers from the farmers market). No tree. No other seasonal trinketry. And I love it. Cozy and peaceful. Simple. So it’s no surprise that I fell for these light-filled “re-photographs” by Canadian-based artist + photographer Amy Friend. Here’re some of her thoughts on her work, “Through hand-manipulated interventions I alter and subsequently re-photograph the images “re-making” photographs that oscillate between what is present and absent. I aim to comment on the fragile quality of the photographic object but also on the fragility of our lives, our history. All are lost so easily. By employing the tools of photography, I “re-use” light, allowing it to shine through the holes. In a playful and yet, literal manner, I return the subjects of the photographs back to the light, while simultaneously bringing them forward. I play with the light and use it metaphorically allowing for new readings, sometimes through heavy-handed applications and at other times delicately. The images are permanently altered; they are lost and reborn, hence the title, Dare alla Luce, an Italian term meaning, “to bring to the light” in reference to birth.” Just the right amount of gently festive. See more via The Jealous Curator + Amy Friend

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Art Crush / Bunnie Reiss

Textile art is a many formed craft. Its very premise is to thread senses from the fabric of life. But I suppose that’s of all art? Regardless, I’m compelled toward use of paint on fabric because the texture woos me. Like the Cosmic Animal Gloves series from Los Angeles based artist Bunnie Reiss… “I’ve always been excited by how easy it is to take something old, transform it, and give it a new life. My Cosmic Animal Gloves are one of my favorite on-going projects where I get to play with the idea of old and new, symmetry and our strange connection to the cosmic world of spirit animals.” I’d feel giddy actually wearing these, though how beautiful would these be as an integral piece in your home? Really lovely. See more of her work here!

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Art Crush / Maria Svarbova

Mária Svarbová photography has such compelling imagery. The layout is an act of pitch perfect streamlining; the colors, dreamy. But there is definitely an unsettling element going on here. Like I want so badly to stare at every single little detail and then fall asleep to it. Still I’m sort of afraid of looking too long. As if I’ll notice something that can’t be unfelt. There’s some melancholy happening? But beauty, a spark, a drive. Here’s her insight… “…departing from traditional portraits to focus on experimentation with space, colour and atmosphere. Her interest in architecture and public spaces, usually build in the Socialist era, led her to create unique sceneries. Human body in Maria’s photographs is more or less a prop, without individuality or emotions. As part of careful composition, beautifully alien figures create still, dream-like scenes with ordinary objects. There is a silent tension, the drama is hidden under clean, smooth surface….Soothing pastels, geometry and visual purity give a sense of otherworldly order, undisturbed visual pleasure that is unattainable in real life. Through her photographs, Maria stops the time and shares her vision: she is not afraid to address the loneliness and isolation, nevertheless she chooses to celebrate its still, calm beauty.” I follow her Instagram (which is fantastic). You can also check out more of her work here!

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